Colombian Coffee Guide – Best Brands, Beans, & Pricing!

Colombian Coffee Guide – Best Brands, Beans, & Pricing!

Coffee is one of the world’s favorite drinks, if it’s somehow not at the very top. It has been estimated that over 2.5 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day. This statistic reveals that well over one-fourth of the world’s population are coffee drinkers.

Truthfully, that number might be closer to nearly half the world’s population as being avid consumers of coffee. This drink is produced in 70 different countries, and there are over 25 million small producers that make this refreshment available for the masses.

The nation of Colombia is one of the world’s top-rated coffee producers. Colombian coffee bean growers produce the third highest amount of coffee products, after Brazil and Vietnam. Their commitment to Columbian coffee is more than just for financial gain.

For many Colombians, coffee is a way of life. The nation not only relies on this substance for economic stability and trade, but most of the people have grown fond of this drink for its cultural and social significance.

The Best Colombian Coffee Brands

best colombian coffee brands

Colombian coffee beans have a great taste, aroma, flavor, and the perfect acidity. Colombian coffee brands such as Java Planet, Colombian Supreme and Melitta Coffee all offer great Colombian coffees. Each of these different flavors are often enjoyed by people in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. These brands offer some of the best Colombian coffee on the market!

Colombian Coffee Beans Are Rooted In Drippin’, Rich History…

No one can honestly say if coffee naturally grew in Colombia before the Spanish arrived. If it did, the Mesoamericans that resided in Columbia did not speak of it much.

The coca and cocoa leaves were the two things these people did grow, long before the arrival of the Spanish. After the Spanish began to conquer most of South America (including Colombia), they began to infuse their culture and society into that of the people they dominated.

One thing that happened was the introduction of coffee. Coffee was brought to Colombia by Spanish Jesuit priests. These holy men brought coffee trees to the New World so that they could be mass-produced by the natives.

However, many of the natives resisted the coffee growing process. At the time, they did not like the idea of growing coffee for their new masters.

Also, if coffee was a big deal in Colombia before the arrival of the Spanish, they would not have had any problem trying to grow the trees.

Many of the new leaders of the region of Colombia were worried about how they were going to survive without having any economically viable way to support themselves.

Francisco Romero was a Jesuit priest who came up with a good idea. He decided to get the people to plant trees instead of showing penance at confession.

What this meant was that people could plant coffee trees for the forgiveness of their sins, as opposed to asking the priests for forgiveness. This process was better received by the conquered local inhabitants.

Many of them did not like their new Christian religion, and wanted to maintain their old belief system. Romero’s plan had caught on, and soon after that, coffee trees were showing up all over the place.

In those days, people seemed to be sinning a lot, so there were many coffee trees planted to make peace with God. Romero’s idea had laid the foundation for the coffee culture that would spring up in Colombia.

After the trees were planted, they each took about 5 years to come to maturity. Once they did, the Colombian monks began to process these Colombian coffee beans with the use of the native population.

This practice took place over time, and eventually, large plantations sprang up. Much of the coffee was grown and sold to territories surrounding Colombia.

However, by the mid-1800’s this crop was finally ready for world export. Remember that coffee arrived during the late 1500’s; it took about another 100 or so years to catch on.

Value Of Colombian Coffee Increases

Between the 15th and 18th centuries, Columbian coffee production was being established. People who lived during those eras realized the value of coffee, as they traded it with their neighbors and adjoining territories. They also discovered how to prepare and consume this brand of coffee in the best way possible.

Coffee in Colombia began being defined by its distinctive taste and unique appeal. However, this crop would experience a dark side to its existence.

Over time, coffee growers were at the mercy of other types of crop producers that were impacting the nation. Many coffee growers were eventually forced to reduce or eliminate their coffee crops.

This was to make room for coca plants to be grown in their place. The need for cocaine and other drugs started to generate a huge, profitable market.

Criminal organizations in, and around Colombia wanted to cash in on this developing trend, and it seriously impeded the coffee market in the nation.

Many farmers, and people who worked in the coffee producing industry, lost their lives because of the high demand of coca leaves. This trend started sometime during the early 20th century, and lasted for nearly 100 years.

Today, coffee producers are now planting more coffee and cocoa crops to stem the tide of violence and criminal activity that has been the result of the coca trade.

What Coffee Means To The People Of Colombia

The people of Colombia love their coffee. While they care about the problems that result from coffee production, they do not allow these problems to dictate their passion for this drink.

Colombians typically drink their coffee in the mid, or latter part of the day. Unlike many westerners, they do not start their day off with a shot of caffeine.

This is because the Colombian people are naturally ready to get up, and get going at the start of each day. However, some Colombian people do drink coffee in the morning time. Just like many westerners, they too like a nice caffeine boost.

Another thing that people need to know is that coffee products in Colombia have not been created equal. The nation has a standard about the type of coffee beans that it can export.

Quality of Colombian Coffee Beans

This standard has to be high, in order to ensure the longevity of the Colombian coffee beans on the international market. Colombian coffee beans that do not meet international coffee standards is grown, and sold locally as “tinto”.

This brand of coffee has a low quality. It is usually dark, and has a very gritty or grimy taste. This type of Columbian coffee is cheaply sold in markets, and is something that most Colombians purchase when they just want a quick cup of Joe to complete their day.

The people of Colombia also view coffee as more of a recreational, or social drink. They don’t drink it for the sake of getting a caffeine rush.

They consume it for the purpose of fellowshipping, or socializing with their friends or acquaintances. That is something that is very interesting about Colombians and their coffee consumption habits. They see coffee as a part of their lives.

People start drinking coffee in Colombia when they are young, and as they mature, they usually continue this habit. They drink special varieties, or blends during their holidays or special occasions.

The inferior brands are typically consumed daily. Many Colombians drink coffee brews to relax, and to compliment their meals.

Colombian coffee beans are infused with nearly every aspect of the culture. People can see carvings, decals, and drawings of it within many public places. They can also see coffee beans on items such as jewelry, symbols on t-shirts, and inscribed on many products.

Don’t forget that the major cities within Colombia have plenty of people that operate a lot like westerners. They wear trendy clothing, carry laptops, and frequent coffee shops. This group of people also make it a point to indulge in coffee culture, and to keep it thriving.

Colombian Coffee Producers

relaxing with colombian coffee

Coffee producers within Colombia primarily compete for export rights. However, the bigger and stronger coffee producing organizations are able to sell their beans internationally.

This is no different from small American farmers who compete against large agricultural producers. Many small farmers in Colombia do their best to produce top notch coffee.

The competition is stronger because many growers must rely on their crops to support themselves. Also, there are many workers who depend on the coffee industry, as well.

Everyone from farm hands, transportation drivers, coffee shop owners, and consumers are all a part of the coffee industry.

Keep in mind that many people like Colombian coffee because of where it’s produced. The Colombian coffee beans are grown in a tropical climate that is extremely compatible with coffee trees.

Colombian farmers have also figured out how to create many different types of coffee strands that produce amazing flavors. Many of the major coffee growers have trade secrets for producing high quality coffee crops.

Conclusion

Colombian coffee continues to be rated among the best in the world, and the competition is fierce. However, Colombian growers have a rich tradition that has been passed down for hundreds of years.

Farmers respect their craft, and they are constantly honing their skills. Colombian coffee growers know that their coffee brands are among the best because of the nation’s people, its land, and its excellent coffee culture.

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